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Q&A with Mitchell Slan, Director of “SNAKE EYES: AN ASMR NIGHTMARE EXPERIENCE”

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Name a Horror character you relate to on a spiritual/personal level?
Jack Torrance. Especially through the quarantine and keeping the process going. I think you can go mad in isolation and you might even learn some new, dark, and hidden things about yourself.

You’ve gotta go through some bad ideas to get to the good ones. Tell us one of your bad ideas. How do you get past the bad ones to find your spark?
A Booger monster. Just Kidding… kind of… we did have a short written about a sick girl escaping a monster that is a physical representation of the virus that’s inside of her. Now with everything going on… maybe it wasn’t such a crazy idea after all.

Do you consider yourself part of a horror community?
Yes! Besides being a pair of horror aficionados, we have been grateful to meet so many talented people at film festivals and horror events. We love to stay in touch with and watch the community grow both in its size and artistry.

When you’re building the world of your film, where do you look for inspiration?
The world of Snake Eyes was built through conversations with the collaborators and production team. The lived experiences of our community was the center point for the life of this film.

What would you do if you woke up inside of your film?
We would feel helpless. In a truer sense, the film represents the world that people of color wake up in every day and the gamble they make just to step outside.

Who would be on your ultimate horror villain squad?
Candy Man, does the luring, because he gets you in the most vulnerable place… the bathroom! Ghost Face, because no one will ever know who they are!
Michael Myers, we could ask him to do anything and he wouldn’t ever feel an ounce of guilt. Hannibal Lector, he can eat up all the evidence!

Lightning round: Freddy or Jason? Stephen King or H.P. Lovecraft? Practical or CGI? Post Apocalypse or Pre Apocalypse?
Freddy, Stephen King, Practical, Pre Apocalyptic.

What scares you, and does it inspire your storytelling?
As storytellers, we believe that using personal experiences and fears is a way to help heal and process these experiences that may be universal and true for many people. The horror genre is a beautiful way to safely experience the real horrors of the world. To offer perspective.

And finally, Ghostface would like to know ​‘What’s your favourite scary movie?’
Costa: ​Michael Haneke​’s​ “Funny Games” made me fall in love with the horror genre. It balances a certain level of self-awareness with social commentary, while still maintaining a compelling story driven by true terror.
Mitchell: “Suspiria” (1977) There is truly nothing like its pacing, color, score, atmosphere, and sense of dread. I could put it on back to back.